CategoryDental Anxiety

Your First Visit with Your New Dentist

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       At our office, if you are not in pain, I would like your first appointment to be a very comprehensive exam. I would like to meet you, get to know your concerns and hear what brought you to us. Next,  I would like to complete a thorough exam. During this time, we will discuss any issues that concern you and obtain any records we may need such as radiographs (x-rays)  or casts (plaster models of your mouth).  This more comprehensive approach will allow me to make a better diagnosis and prevent overlooking any problems.

“This more comprehensive approach will allow me to make a better diagnosis and prevent overlooking any problems.”

      By doing a more complete analysis, we can decide things such as what type of cleaning you will need and where we need to start on your treatment plan. With this gathering of information and your input, I can put together a treatment plan tailored just for your needs. This treatment plan is created only for you. Once you and I have a clear set of goals, we can begin.

“This treatment plan is created only  for you.”

       This treatment planning is sometimes overlooked, but is truly a vital part of providing customized care for each individual. It also represents the blue print for your dental care for a lifetime.

Sincerely,

M. Scott Smith, DMD

 

Wow!!! Buffered Anesthetic Equals LESS PAIN and More Profound Numbness

2099Dental anesthetics are currently stabilized for shipment with hydrochloric acid which, upon injection, can cause a stinging sensation. Before the anesthetic begins working, your body must naturally buffer the solution before it can be absorbed and numb the nerves. This is why, many times, the dentist gives an injection and has to wait 10-30 minutes before you begin to feel the full effect. Some patients have limited or slower ability to buffer. This means they may not ever feel completely numb, if at all.

Some patients have limited or slower ability to buffer. This means they may not ever feel completely numb, if at all.

At our office, we have the ability to buffer the anesthetic dose before the injection. A small amount of sterile sodium bicarbonate is placed into the anesthetic solution prior to giving you the injection. This dramatically increases the effectiveness of the anesthetic and reduces the time it takes to fully feel the effects. It can also reduce or eliminate the stinging sensation usually felt during the injection itself. in the past, I have had patients report not being able to get numb, even after having several injections in the same area. Buffering the anesthetic before the injection dramatically reduces these types of problems.

Buffering the anesthetic before the injection dramatically reduces these types of problems.

At our office, we always strive to make your visit as comfortable as possible, and buffered anesthetic is just another method to provide our patients with the best care possible.

Sincerely,

M. Scott Smith, DMD